Tag: tech news

Call Of Duty Modern Warefare

Here’s why Call of Duty: Modern Warfare’s weapons may feel a little different than you’re used to

13 Aug 19
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Infinity Ward discusses bullet drop and weapon archetype changes

(Image credit: Activision)

In a lot of ways, Activision and Infinity Ward are going back to basics with the Call of Duty: Modern Warfare reboot. Returning characters, classic guns, and none (or way, way less) of the new-age sci-fi nuttiness that’s defined the most recent games. But as Infinity Ward explained in a recent blog post, the new Modern Warfare is also making fundamental changes to the way weapons handle. 

“We were a little less precious with these [weapons] systems,” said multiplayer design director Geoff Smith. “We looked to see what still made sense, and pulled stuff out that we feel didn’t work, even if it made the team uncomfortable. Everybody on the team had pre-conceived notions on what ‘Call of Duty’ is and we had to shake people out of that mindset.” 

Some longstanding weapon types are also receiving a bit of a shake-up. SMGs, for instance, have been high-recoil close-range weapons for years, but as Smith noted, “in reality, they are low-calibre weapons and are easier to control; they’re lower damage, they’re fairly accurate, so we’ve shifted the role of that weapon around.”

At the same time, some of the customisation options coming in the Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Gunsmith system will give weapons a huge range of, well, ranges. Smith teased that “we have a shotgun that you can make by adding a long-barrel and a sniper scope, making it a sniper shotgun. Or you can modify that same weapon by removing the barrel and stock, and get this snub-nose, super-fast weapon that’s completely different than how you started out.”

Speaking of the multiplayer skill ceiling: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare will thankfully have dedicated servers on all platforms.

 

Call of Duty fans, you can finally rest easy: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare will have dedicated servers and support crossplay at launch. According to a Game Informer cover story (via Charlie Intel), Infinity Ward and Activision are confirming that alongside full cross-play support for PC, PS4, and Xbox One, Modern Warfare will feature dedicated servers to ideally help ensure stability at launch and beyond.

Dedicated servers aren’t anything new to Call of Duty, but with the introduction of crossplay support to the franchise with the upcoming Modern Warfare, it’s even more crucial to ensure stable server performance by forking out for dedicated servers. With the pervasive issue of server instability in online competitive gaming, it’s a big relief to hear it’s quickly becoming commonplace for AAA developers to address the issue before it becomes an issue.

As for cross-play, it’ll work similar to Fortnite, where matchmaking is input-based. That means players using controllers will be paired with other controller-users, and mouse & keyboard players will be paired up likewise. As for PC players looking to play with console-based friends, Infinity Ward has come up with a seemingly workable solution; in these situations, teams of mixed input players will be matched with other teams comprised of both mouse & keyboard players and controller players.

 
 

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The Big O

Every Console In One Box

28 Jul 19
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Every Console In One Box – The Origin Big O

A first look from Unbox therapy

 

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Intel

Intel admits it won’t catch up with AMD’s 7nm chips until 2021

18 Jul 19
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By  of Tech Radar

 

Intel has explained how it struggled to bring 10-nanometer processors to market, while also admitting that we won’t see its 7nm chips until 2021.

The revelations come from Intel CEO Bob Swan, who said at Fortune’s Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colorado, that Intel’s goal to have a 2.7x transistor density improvement in its 10nm chips compared to current 14nm chips was too ambitious.

“At a time when it gets harder and harder, we set a more aggressive goal. From that it just took us longer,” Swan said.

Because of this, Intel has been slow to move on from 14nm. This has led many people to suggest that – for Intel at least – Moore’s Law is dead.

Moore is less

Moore’s Law, which is named after Intel co-founder and former CEO Gordon Moore, states that transistor density in computer chips doubles every two years. It’s been a driving principle behind Intel’s processor strategy, and many people credit it with the fast pace of technological advancements we’ve seen in the past.

Because of Intel’s delays with 10nm, it has fallen behind this schedule. However, with 10nm out this year and 7nm out by 2021, Intel is hoping it can catch up with Moore’s Law.

Swan admits that the 2.7x scaling for 10nm was both too ambitious and too complicated. He also explains how Intel made an error when it “prioritised performance at a time when predictability was really important”.

However, as Swan notes, “The short story is we learned from it, we’ll get our 10nm node out this year. Our 7nm node will be out in two years and it will be a 2.0X scaling so back to the historical Moore’s Law curve.”

 

So it looks like we’ll finally see 10nm chips from Intel this year, while 7nm will have to wait until 2021. That’s a long time considering both AMD and Qualcomm have 7nm chips out right now. But will Intel be happy with ceding any performance advantage 7nm brings to its two biggest competitors for that long?